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Couture and ConsensusFashion and Politics in Postcolonial Argentina$
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Regina A. Root

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780816647934

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816647934.001.0001

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Dressed to Kill

Dressed to Kill

Chapter:
(p.35) Two Dressed to Kill
Source:
Couture and Consensus
Author(s):

Regina A. Root

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816647934.003.0002

This chapter discusses how female bravery is represented by the acts of sewing and embroidery. When men go off to war, women are left at home doing the domestic chores. But during the regime of Juan Manuel de Rosas, women began to take active political roles such as sewing the uniforms or flags for men, or with men planning for war. In spite of the women’s growing political participation, violence and manipulation are still visible. This chapter then traces the political gender-specific assignments within the Argentine history, presenting women with the least significance in the Argentine-Spanish society.

Keywords:   female bravery, sewing, embroidery, political participation, Juan Manuel de Rosas, political roles, gender-specific assignments

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