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Whiskey BreakfastMy Swedish Family, My American Life$
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Richard C. Lindberg

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780816646845

Published to Minnesota Scholarship Online: August 2015

DOI: 10.5749/minnesota/9780816646845.001.0001

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The Shadows of Despair

The Shadows of Despair

Chapter:
(p.51) 4 The Shadows of Despair
Source:
Whiskey Breakfast
Author(s):

Richard C. Lindberg

Publisher:
University of Minnesota Press
DOI:10.5749/minnesota/9780816646845.003.0004

In this chapter, the author, a first-generation Swedish American, reflects on the hardships experienced by his father, Oscar Waldemar Lindberg, and his family as Swedish immigrants in Chicago. The Depression idled thousands of men and women in Swedetown. As the Depression deepened, Oscar’s ever-present anxieties were compounded by his fear of job loss. Yet America had opened up new possibilities for Oscar and his two friends from Göteborg, Otto Jacobson and Henry Cederberg. Otto went to work in a jeweler’s shop; Henry moved into a South Side rooming house with his young wife, Signe Maria Andersson Cederberg, who worked as a housekeeper for a wealthy jeweler named Jacobs; and Oscar hustled jobs in the building trades. In 1932, Oscar married Svea Anderson, the daughter of Alfred Anderson, an officer of the Blekinge Gilles. Blekinge Gilles was a private social club organized by Oscar and Harold Windahl. Between 1932 and 1935, Oscar received letters from Sweden. He also met General Robert E. Wood, a brigadier general during World War I.

Keywords:   letters, Swedish immigrants, Oscar Waldemar Lindberg, Chicago, Depression, Swedetown, Otto Jacobson, Svea Anderson, Sweden, Robert E. Wood

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